Articles from Working In These Times

Today’s UAW Vote in Mississippi is a Battle for the Soul of the U.S. Labor Movement

After years of painstaking work by United Auto Workers (UAW) organizers to build support for a union at the big Nissan auto and truck assembly plant near Canton, Miss., the workers themselves will vote today and tomorrow on whether to accept UAW their collective bargaining voice at the plant.

The Quaint Baltimore Seafood Business That Masks Shocking Labor Abuses

Phillips Seafood is a Baltimore-based company that trades on its historic connections to the Chesapeake Bay blue crab fishery. The signature dish at its restaurants is the famed Maryland-style crab cake, and its dining rooms feature models of antique fishing boats and romanticized images of the bay watermen culture that is fading fast. But it’s mostly fake—a cover story for a rapacious, globalized business that preys on poor Indonesian women to extract rich profits for its U.S. owners.

The Quaint Baltimore Seafood Business That Masks Shocking Labor Abuses Overseas

Phillips Seafood is a Baltimore-based company that trades on its historic connections to the Chesapeake Bay blue crab fishery. The signature dish at its restaurants is the famed Maryland-style crab cake, and its dining rooms feature models of antique fishing boats and romanticized images of the bay watermen culture that is fading fast. But it’s mostly fake—a cover story for a rapacious, globalized business that preys on poor Indonesian women to extract rich profits for its U.S. owners.

It’s Not Just Class: The Fight for Racial Justice Is Inseparable from Overcoming Capitalism

On the surface, it would seem easy to think about race and class together. Not too long ago, I would have regarded a challenging formulation in C.L.R. James’s classic book The Black Jacobins as giving an elegant, if a little vague, solution to the question of how we do so: “the race question is subsidiary to the class question in politics,” James wrote, “and to think of imperialism in terms of race is disastrous.” But, he immediately added, “to neglect the racial factor as merely incidental is an error only less grave than to make it fundamental.”

One Taxi Driver’s Story of Trying to Survive in the Age of Uber

It’s 4 p.m. and Nnamdi Uwazie has taken in only $122, which means he has another five hours to drive to just cover his daily costs. Another 15-hour day in the cab and maybe nothing for him.

But this is how life has been lately for the 53-year-old taxi driver.

Since Uber and other ride-share businesses have crowded Chicago’s streets, his customers have become ghosts, and a livelihood that once sustained his family of five has virtually disappeared.

NPR Workers Just Showed Us Why Journalists Need to Organize

NPR workers just proved that collective action works, and—in today’s media landscape—staff unions are more important than ever.

The Screen Actors Guild‐American Federation of Television and Radio Artists (SAG-AFTRA) and National Public Radio (NPR) reached a tentative, three-year agreement shortly after midnight on July 15, preventing more than 400 NPR employees from going on strike.

How New Jersey Workers Made Chris Christie Blink and Saved the State from a Disastrous Shutdown

This article first appeared in Labor Notes.

Lea Chilelli, a steward in the Division of Developmental Disabilities in New Jersey, felt blindsided when Governor Chris Christie ordered the state shut down July 2. “There was chaos,” she said. “All my members were texting me finding out what was going on and what they should do. Management was clueless and they were telling people all different things.”

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