Articles from Working In These Times

Teachers Unions Are Pushing Back Against Draconian Student Discipline Policies

This post first appeared at Labor Notes.

Two kindergarteners are poking each other with their pencils. What starts as a game soon gets out of hand. With one child bleeding, the teacher brings them to the principal’s office. Later, she finds out both kids were suspended and sent home.

Rolling Strike By Teamsters at US Foods Aims to Protect Union Jobs

A rolling strike is hitting multiple warehouses operated by the nation-wide grocery distributor US Foods, Inc. as the Teamsters union tries to fight off threats to its jobs by death from a thousand corporate cuts.

The War on Workers’ Comp

For nearly a century, millions of workers have endured punishing jobs in construction, mining and factory work—jobs with high levels of work-related disability and injury. As a tradeoff for the dangers, they’ve had the assurance of workers’ compensation if injured permanently on the job. Employers accepted this deal, albeit sometimes grudgingly, because it  removed the possibility of being sued over work-related injuries. 

But as labor has weakened and Republicans have won control of more and more statehouses, states have slowly chipped away at workers’ compensation benefits.

In the UAW, Rising Academic Worker Unionism Is Haunted By the Ghost of Walter Reuther

First published at Jacobin.

Things are looking up for student worker unionism. For decades, the legions of graduate and undergraduate teaching and research assistants whose labor is critical to the daily functioning of universities have fought to establish a basic claim: the work they do is, in fact, work—it’s not just part of their education.

New Labor Board Ruling Restricts Bosses’ Ability To Hire Permanent Replacements for Striking Workers

This aricle originally appeared at Labor Notes.

A game-changing interpretation from the Obama-appointed National Labor Relations Board has narrowed the allowable reasons why an employer may hire permanent replacements during a strike.

Last week’s ruling reinterprets the 1938 Supreme Court decision Mackay Radio & Telegraph, widely reviled by labor. That case affirmed employers’ right to hire permanent replacements.

Are Software Engineers the Latest Exploited Migrant Workers?

Before Elton Kent ever set foot in New York, his career was going swimmingly. A son of India’s upper-middle-class, he had cut his teeth at a start-up, and finagled that into a prized job offer as a software engineer at the most prestigious firm in India: Accenture. Then, he says, in 2012, another stroke of good fortune came: Management was going to transfer him to New York City.

To bring him to the United States, Accenture applied for an L-1 visa, one of two visas for workers with knowledge or skills deemed to be in short supply among Americans.

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