Articles from Working In These Times

What’s Worse Than Airline Food? The Catering Companies Selling It.

Airline catering workers are fed up with what they say are intolerable conditions and low wages, and they brought that message to doorstep of the Airline Passenger Experience Association Expo, held in Long Beach, Calif. during the last week of September. Roughly 150 UNITE HERE members, most from the Los Angeles local with some backup from Phoenix, staged a lively picket of the expo as attendees looked on.

Trump and the GOP’s New Tax Plan Is a Giant Gift to the 1%

When Barack Obama was president, congressional Republicans were deficit hawks. They opposed almost everything Obama wanted to do by arguing it would increase the federal budget deficit.

But now that Republicans are planning giant tax cuts for corporations and the wealthy, they’ve stopped worrying about deficits.

The Left Needs Its Own Shock Doctrine for Puerto Rico

Welcome to Interviews for Resistance. We’re now several months into the Trump administration, and activists have scored some important victories in those months. Yet there is always more to be done, and for many people, the question of where to focus and how to help remains. In this series, we talk with organizers, agitators and educators—not only about how to resist, but how to build a better world.

Opponents of School Privatization Are Very Worried About a New Law in Illinois. Here’s Why.

Chicago public schools began classes this month after securing much-needed money from the state. But the funding bill came with a provision that critics say could imperil public education in the state and serve as a frightening precedent for the rest of the country. 

This “poison pill,” as teachers unions call it, allows individuals and corporations to donate to private schools in lieu of paying taxes. Many opponents liken this to school voucher programs, which can be devastating to public schools. 

“Right to Work” Doesn’t Have to Mean Defeat for Labor. These Nurses Prove Workers Can Still Win.

Nurses in rural northern Michigan made history August 9-10 when we won labor’s biggest organizing victory since “right to work” took effect in the state in 2013. By a vote of 489–439, more than 1,000 RNs at Traverse City’s Munson Medical Center, the area’s largest employer, will be represented by the Michigan Nurses Association.

Oklahoma Is Imprisoning So Many People It Can’t Hire Enough Guards To Keep Up

In July of this year, some 150 prisoners at the Great Plains Correctional Facility in Tulsa, Okla., rioted. The riot reportedly developed after a fight between prisoners and lasted for about eight hours. Two prison guards were taken hostage before the prisoners were corralled and returned to their cells.

This Lawyer Helped Reagan Bust the Air Traffic Controllers Union. Now Trump Wants Him on the NLRB.

Former President Ronald Reagan had a long history of clashing with organized labor, but his most infamous moment came in 1981, when he busted the Professional Air Traffic Controllers Organization (PATCO) and fired more than 11,300 air traffic controllers who were on strike. This act weakened the power of U.S. unions and set the stage for an all-out assault on organizing rights.

After Member Is Deported, New York Teamsters Declare Themselves Sanctuary Union

Welcome to Interviews for Resistance. We’re now several months into the Trump administration, and activists have scored some important victories in those months. Yet there is always more to be done, and for many people, the question of where to focus and how to help remains. In this series, we talk with organizers, agitators and educators about how to resist and build a better world.

Low Wages in Illinois: When Corporations Don’t Pay, the Public Does

Anti-tax fever seems to be on the rise in Illinois, most recently in editorial and public comments about the Cook County Board of Commissioners’ levy on sugary drinks. But those who’ve fretted about the penny-an-ounce tax—and all of us who didn’t—might want to turn their attention and ire to a far-greater burden on Illinois taxpayers: Governor Bruce Rauner’s veto of legislation that would raise the minimum wage to $15 an hour over the next five years.

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