Articles from Working In These Times

Low Wages And No Stability: How Amazon’s Use of Perma-Temps Is Hurting Workers

Every day at 4:30 a.m., Dwayne Wilson, 25, wakes up to find out whether he’s going to be needed as a forklift driver at the warehouse he works at in the Los Angeles neighborhood of Wilmington. Sometimes he gets a call telling him not to come in. Sometimes he goes in to find out that he’s not needed that day. On average, he works just three eight-hour days per week, at $15 per hour. 

A Rundown of All the Ways Trump Is Overseeing an All Out, Under-the-Radar Attack on Workers

Amidst headlines about porn stars and bromance with Russian President Vladimir Putin, it can be hard to track the many ways the Trump administration is hurting workers in the United States. The Supreme Court’s Janus ruling that struck a blow to unions’ ability to collect membership dues held a brief spotlight in the national news churn. But in a more-quiet fashion, the Trump administration already has been slowly dismantling worker protections, especially those enacted under the Obama administration.     

How to Defend Workers Against Immigration Raids

As the Trump administration cracks down on undocumented immigrants, it’s urgent for worker centers and unions to organize to defend immigrant members.

Meet the Militant Taxi Drivers Union That Just Defeated Uber and Lyft

The New York Taxi Workers Alliance knows how to throw a punch.

On August 14, the scrappy but militant 21,000 member union representing taxi and for-hire vehicle drivers in New York City won a landmark legislative victory establishing the country’s first cap on ride-sharing company vehicles and essentially forcing them to pay their drivers a minimum wage.

Trump’s NLRB Is Back in Action After Its Ethics Scandal—And It’s Not Good for Workers

The Trump-dominated National Labor Relations Board has been mostly quiet this summer, largely as the result of an ethics scandal that has tainted some of its earlier anti-union work. But NLRB initiatives are quietly underway to restart attacks on labor rights, including an effort disclosed August 1 that could restrict how workers can use email on the job.

How a Small Town in Iowa Freed Local Workers From ICE Detention

MT. PLEASANT, IOWA—Isabel discovered she was pregnant May 14. She and her husband, Jack (names changed because of his undocumented status), had been trying to start a family for years. They had a miscarriage in 2015. In 2016, their baby girl died an hour and a half after being born premature. Given the past complications, this new pregnancy was a huge deal. But Isabel wasn’t able to tell Jack in person. 

ALEC Is Pushing a New Slate of Viscously Anti-Worker, Pro-Corporate Laws

When the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) convened its 45th annual meeting of legislators and corporate lobbyists at the swank Hilton New Orleans Riverside hotel on August 8, it served up a veritable banquet of union-busting, gerrymandering, pro-fossil fuel, and school privatization proposals for lawmakers to take back home.

UPS Is Flush With Cash. It’s Up to Workers to Demand the Company Cough It Up.

The econ 101 explanation of how wages and benefits work goes something like this: when times are tough and companies are losing money, they have to limit workers’ compensation and hire less. When they’re flush with cash, companies bump up workers’ pay and hire more.

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