Articles from Institute for Policy Studies

Something We Can Agree On: Close Some Overseas Bases

This moment, after the midterm elections and before the partisan wars get fully back into gear, is the right time to take note of efforts to reach across America’s political divide. In an open letter going Thursday to Congress and the administration, a group of military analysts from across the ideological spectrum came together to argue for closing U.S. military bases overseas.

It’s a Borderful World

Nation-states: what a quaint notion.

As a means of organizing territory, they seem to be a brief transition period between large empires and an even larger, borderless world. Sure, nation-states might live on in the form of anthems and flags and independence days, but the idea of fixed borders just don’t make sense in a world of cell phones, the Internet, and global assembly lines. Borders just seem like a twentieth-century contrivance that slows everything down, like those paper forms you still have to fill out at the doctor’s office.

The Carcinogens That Come in Pay Envelopes

Cancer kills. Every American knows that. Every American knows a family that has encountered — and suffered from — cancer. Cancer is also helping some Americans become exceedingly rich. And these Americans will do most anything to keep their windfalls coming, even prey on the fragile psyches of the families cancer strikes.

Accessible Housing Should Be Affordable, Too

When Anne Johansen imagined the difficulties of living in a nursing home, she was mostly nervous about the food and potential privacy issues. Those ended up being the least of her worries. Johansen went through four separate nursing homes over seven years — moving due to mistreatment and safety concerns.

Can the Next Congress Chase Down America’s Runaway Wealth?

The next Congress faces a stunning array of challenges — on health care, gun policy, climate change, you name it. One crucial challenge starved of attention, however, is what I call runaway inter-generational wealth.

That’s where the wealth of a country’s richest families snowballs from one generation to the next, unconstrained by living expenses or taxes, causing an ever-increasing share of national wealth to concentrate at the top. America has experienced this problem for decades now, and last year’s tax act is certain to make it worse.

Gilded Giving 2018: Top-Heavy Philanthropy and Its Risks to the Independent Sector

What are the risks to the autonomy of the independent nonprofit sector—not to mention our democracy—when a growing amount of philanthropic power is held in fewer hands?

A new Institute for Policy Studies report, Gilded Giving 2018: Top-Heavy Philanthropy and Its Risks to the Independent Sector, takes a close look at the impact of increasing economic inequality on the philanthropic sector.

Report: Gilded Giving 2018

What are the risks to the autonomy of the independent nonprofit sector—not to mention our democracy—when a growing amount of philanthropic power is held in fewer hands?

Corporations Should Share the Wealth Before Buying Back Stock

These are good times for those at the top of the Walmart empire. Family members of the founders have seen their wealth grow about 10,000% since the 1980s. Today the Waltons are worth about $180 billion. And they own so much Walmart stock that four of them made $12.7 billion in just one day last year after a profit report bumped up their share price.

Some Leveraging Inspiration from Old Archimedes

The ancient Greek Archimedes, the greatest scientist of his time, understood the principle of leverage better than any mortal ever had. With a long enough lever — a rigid bar resting over a fulcrum — Archimedes believed he could work mechanical miracles.

“Give me a place to stand,” the folklore of science has Archimedes proclaiming, “and I can move the world.”

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