Articles from Working In These Times

Let’s Challenge Corporate Democrats and Fight for a Universal Job Guarantee

Welcome to Interviews for Resistance. We’re now into the second year of the Trump administration, and the last year has been filled with ups and downs, important victories, successful holding campaigns, and painful defeats. We’ve learned a lot, but there is always more to learn, more to be done. In this now-weekly series, we talk with organizers, agitators, and educators, not only about how to resist, but how to build a better world. 

The VA Is the Closest Thing We Have to Single Payer. Now Trump Wants to Privatize It.

Aaron Hughes, who was deployed to Kuwait and Iraq in 2003 and 2004, now has a serious, very rare lung condition. But he told In These Times he gets “really outstanding care” at the nearby Jesse Brown VA Medical Center. “The doctors are at the top of their class,” he said.

An Oakland Coal Terminal Is Officially Stalled—Thanks To a Labor-Environmental Alliance

In Oakland, California, labor and environmental activists have worked together to successfully stop—at least temporarily—a new coal export terminal from being built on the city’s West Side. After residents learned in 2015 that the export site had been added onto a proposed waterfront project by Bay Area developer Phil Tagami, they quickly organized to convince Oakland City Council to block the project.

The West Virginia Teachers’ Strike Has Activists Asking: Should We Revive the Wildcat?

The stunning success of the recent statewide West Virginia teachers’ strike makes it one of the most inspiring worker protests of the Trump era.

The walkout over rising health insurance costs and stagnant pay began on Feb. 22 and appeared to be settled by Feb. 27 with promises from Gov. Jim Justice of a 5 percent pay raise for teachers. Union leaders initially accepted that deal in good faith, along with vague assurances that the state would work with them on a solution to escalating out-of-pocket costs for workers’ healthcare. 

“A Living History Lesson”: Teachers Reflect on the Massive West Virginia Strike

Charleston, W. Va.—The teachers’ strike in West Virginia ended Tuesday after the Republican-controlled West Virginia Senate and House of Delegates voted to pass a 5 percent pay raise bill for public employees that Republican Gov. Jim Justice later signed into law.

The West Virginia Strike Points a Path Forward for the Labor Movement

​Yesterday, West Virginia’s educators produced an incredible lesson plan on power. The timing and outcome of their struggle is epic. Before and during their strike—an unprecedented statewide walkout that shuttered doors to every school in the state’s 55 counties—the national media was writing the obituary of public-service unions, a narrative driven by the oral arguments in the Supreme Court case Janus vs AFSCME.

The Lesson From West Virginia Teachers? If You Want to Win, Go on Strike.

For many years, observers have been ringing the death knell for the U.S. labor movement. West Virginia teachers haven’t just pumped life back into that movement—they’ve reaffirmed the fundamental principle that the key to building power and winning is for workers to withhold their labor.

Illinois Grad Students Are on Strike to Make the University Accessible for the Working Class

On February 26, four days after teachers in all 55 West Virginia counties walked out on strike, graduate workers at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) followed suit. Filling the leafy quad of Illinois’ flagship state university, hundreds of graduate workers and supporters gathered to protest a plan that the school’s Graduate Employees Union (GEO) argues will turn the university into a “for-profit business, one that leaves poor and working class students out of its storied halls.” As of Tuesday, UIUC grad students remain on strike.